RESURRECTION

copyright Richard Campbell ResurrectionGawguun and Birrigun – RESURRECTION            by  Richard Campbell.

In talking* of his paintings aboriginal artist, RICHARD CAMPBELL,  said:

 “We all have a spiritual connection, we’re all brothers and sisters, with the animals, the trees, rivers and rocks, we all belong to one big God – call it Christ, we call it Birrigun, we are all one in God.”  He said: “… that although you are from different nations of the world, it is important to recognise Christ and the connection between Aboriginal spirituality and bible stories.’

The use of the colour blue denotes the sky where the birds are and the water. The dots and die hands in the painting represent the elders and (the Holy Spirit). The journey symbol in the tree trunk denotes how the elders are buried in the roots of the tree and their spirit rises up through the branches. It also signifies Richard’s journey with the Holy Spirit.

The tree is the Murribi tree, for the Gumbayngirr people, all things happened around dial tree. The dead were buried in the tree and the people believed that their spirits of the elders rise through the tree through the brunches and go out into the Dreaming.

When Birrigun died he went into spirit and then into the Dreaming and after his resurrection through the Murribi tree he appeared to his people as the Southern Cross, that is the journey of Birrigun. in Gumbayngirr his name means the southern cross, he was the champion for the Gumbaingirr people like Jesus is to Christians.

When Birrigun’s mother – Gawguun buried him in a Murribi tree it was scaled with a rock so (hat no aminals could get into the burial site. Every year at the same time she would visit the site to mourn him (this is at Arakoon at South West Rocks. NSW, Australia) but one year the elders noticed she did not come. Instead they saw a brolga dancing around the tomb and they believed it was her spirit. Her tears for her son fall into the coolamon which is the feminine symbol because it is the vessel of life, carrying water, food and babies. It is painted with markings just the way that Richard’s father taught him when he was a boy.

 It is important to let people around the world know that there was a religion of spirituality in Australia before we were colonised by white people.” These paintings “show the way Aboriginal people lived – by the law of the land. You’ve got to look after everything; humans, animals, the environment and the land….”(They) show the message of Christ himself: of good will.”

The description of this artwork and aboriginal story comes directly from Australian Catholic Ministries, Lismore 2008 archive.

Richard Campbell was born into the Dhungutti tribe, near Bowraville on the North Coast of NSW, in 1956.  For more information on the artist visit ACM Sydney website.

*Adapted from extract of editorial produced by Elise Dalley from PROJECTeye interviewing the artist.

These images(commissioned for Sydney World Youth Day, 2008), are the property of Aboriginal Catholic Ministries, Sydney. The copyright of these images is retained by the artist and this article is presented under Creative Commons provisions to respect and affirm the work of the artist and his intentions in a particular context.

 

Arise

Created with Microsoft Fresh Paint

 “Look!

though night still covers the earth

and darkness the peoples,

on you Yahweh is rising and over you 

his glory can be seen.”

 

Isaiah 60:1-2


Image copyright - Inset artwork Grief by artistaeli, used with permission.

ert of my inertia

copyright creative-spiritual-directions.com heart
Week 3 Today’s Readings Hosea 5:15-6:6 Lk:18:9-14

You are my call; my peace,

I have known You.

Your peace – sublime reassurance,

rest, acceptance, serenity trust.

 

You have taken me to You  

I chose to be embedded;

enmeshed, felted; immersed and baptised in You.

 

I thank you,        protect me God

in You is my refuge –

haven of  life, of my  security and truth.

 

To You I say    –   ‘You are my Lord’.

My happiness is in none of these sacred spirits of the earth,

nothing satisfies, nothing lasts

but ineffable embracing life and love.

 

Transcent life and light,

e(a)rt  of my inertia.

Spirit to my  spirit,

ineffable constant to my waivering,

serene sublimity to my flailing,

security, tranquility to my tussling,

reassurance to my tarrying.

 

My birthright, fullness, gift, freedom,

unbounded, limitless beyond expectation

I relate to you –   

consumation.

 

The measuring line marks out for me a delightful place,

You are my direction, my dance, my light, my gift,

my vision, my vigour, my process, my flow,

my ert –

ert of my art, You are.

 

Therefore I am being;  human and spirit with You.

You will teach me the path of life,

unbounded joy in Your presence,

forever beside You.

Thou art

Yahweh my inheritance.

 

 

(A refrain echoing from Ps 16) 

Inner sense

Week 3 Lent Today’s Readings: Deut 4:1,5-9 Matt 5:17-19

The-WoesW

Innocence

in a sense

is like incense      ….   innocence…  

it rises up and offers something of its very being

to inner sense

innocence   –   seemingly elusive   yet

my inner sense

in a sense  –  it touches me  …  I behold it,

in a sense – I perceive its vapour,

I am in sense  arising  inner sense

an incense

to my being in innocence.

I wrote this verse as the word ‘innocence’ invited me this morning to ‘feel out’ its dimensions within me. In rising awareness of the work of Michael Leunig – artist, poet, philospher and officially declared Australian Living Treasure in 1999,   I sought out an image and had NO knowledge of what follows.  All within me blossomed as I discovered a gem -an extract follows from:

 “Ideas of Spirituality, Art and Innocence”  by Michael Leunig*:

“Why do I choose to put together this wonderful holy trinity of spirituality, art and innocence?  … The simple truth is that I believe these things are treasures that matter hugely to the health of the individual and society…

I have come to understand my spirituality as an ongoing internal lyrical state of consciousness, semi-consciousness and unconsciousness in which I find meaning, comfort, refuge, inspiration, mystery and strength. …

With spirit, one is able to have and hold many feelings, and live a felt life. The spirit supports and negotiates between our feelings, instincts and intuitions …

I cannot help but think that a rich and confident spiritual life is a form of genius.  …

The spirit lies at the heart of our character and personality; our individual, divine self, which is one of the greatest treasures we will ever have access to. …

Any thoughts of spirituality lead me quite naturally to the idea of art because in my view, and in my experience, art is an aspect or an expression of our individual spiritual reality.

I make the point that mystery is not confusion, rather it is an enchantment of the imagination and spirit. Indeed art is a spiritual project.  …

In essence, spirituality and art are interwoven in their raw searching, in their expression, in their courageous unknowing, in their joy and darkness and in their radiant innocent strength which finds its way into the human heart. …

A direct link to the wondrous, innocent experiences of childhood might, in mature age, be called mature innocence.  … I have found some of my most meaningful, useful and joyous work there. It is my studio within my studio. We might also understand mature innocence as mindfulness.”

I encourage you to visit the site for his full essay given as keynote presentation at 10th Dialogue Australasia Network Conference, 11 April 2015.  http://www.leunig.com.au/ideas/spirituality-art-innocence?showall=1&limitstart=   Words and image provided with gracious courtesy of Michael Leunig.

Gifted

SAMSUNG
 Today’s Scriptures:  Lev 19:1-2, 11-18  Mat 25:31-46

SAMSUNG

I was astounded…surprised… It was a gift to me that morning.  I saw this tiny flower   … as I passed.  It had stopped me in my tracks.  I hastened slowly. Like a flower in the desert it bloomed on a barren brick wall. Moved by its unexpected beauty I returned to take a photo.

To my greater surprise and delight, this young man chose to pose for me.

It became for me a moment of grace.  In some small way the flower was a precursor to a bigger experience.  It opened me to the wonder of that encounter.  The joy of the young man became my focus. He was quite unaware of the little flower and became the memorable gift.

We cannot be prepared for the unexpected; for those moments of inspiration or insight which come to us as gift.  No matter how much we may desire or seek after them, they are beyond our control …  they are gift given freely.

Something resounds deep in our spirit in these experiences. They remain with us as moments of being touched by the Other.  Often they prompt us or reorient our gaze or thought.

For people attuned in the arts this is the visitation of the creative spirit which imparts inspiration.

In Roman and Greek mythology, The Charites or Three Graces are daughters of the Gods,  known as benevolent spirits of giving and receiving – gracious in virtue, bestowing  beauty, wisdom and creative inspiration.  They were invoked particularly by artists, poets and musicians.

At various times, we all experience moments of grace –  bestowed on us as surprise from a source beyond us.   The experience is often marked by a spiritual recognition that this was “out of the ordinary”.

Often it is described as “suddenly”   or mysteriously,  and associated with an inner conviction of a truth or insight which is uniquely and personally significant. It may simply be a nuance or a word, but it resonates profoundly.

In some particular way grace finds us in a place of relative darkness and brings to us new light.  Grace is a light on our path to inspire us forward and leads us to new ways.

Whether we suppress them, forget them or cherish them, we are touched. Writers, artists and people of many cultures and faiths make space to wait upon the Spirit and become graciously receptive. They receive the gift and become instruments of the flow of grace.

Through contemplative spiritual direction individuals  revisit such experiences and prayerfully discern their personal meaning.  We grow slowly to recognize the spiritual presence and  foster an ongoing relationship with the Creator Spirit.


Suggested Reading:

“The God of Surprises”    Gerard Hughes.

Eerdmans Publishing Co.  2008